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FAST Telescope Finds Pulsars during Trial Operation

Oct 11, 2017     Email"> PrintText Size

 

Li Di, chief scientist at the National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC), introduces the findings of two pulsars by the China-based FAST, the world's largest single-dish radio telescope, in Beijing, capital of China, Oct. 10, 2017. After one year of trial operation, the FAST has identified two pulsars, the NAOC said Tuesday. Located in a naturally deep and round karst depression in southwest China's Guizhou Province, FAST, which stands for Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope, was completed in September 2016. (Xinhua/Jin Liwang)

 

Li Di, chief scientist at the National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC), introduces the findings of two pulsars by the China-based FAST, the world's largest single-dish radio telescope, in Beijing, capital of China, Oct. 10, 2017. After one year of trial operation, the FAST has identified two pulsars, the NAOC said Tuesday. Located in a naturally deep and round karst depression in southwest China's Guizhou Province, FAST, which stands for Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope, was completed in September 2016. (Xinhua/Jin Liwang)

 

Li Di, chief scientist at the National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC), introduces the findings of two pulsars by the China-based FAST, the world's largest single-dish radio telescope, in Beijing, capital of China, Oct. 10, 2017. After one year of trial operation, the FAST has identified two pulsars, the NAOC said Tuesday. Located in a naturally deep and round karst depression in southwest China's Guizhou Province, FAST, which stands for Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope, was completed in September 2016. (Xinhua/Jin Liwang)

 

A press conference is held to introduce the findings of two pulsars by the China-based FAST, the world's largest single-dish radio telescope, at the National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC) in Beijing, capital of China, Oct. 10, 2017. After one year of trial operation, the FAST has identified two pulsars, the NAOC said Tuesday. Located in a naturally deep and round karst depression in southwest China's Guizhou Province, FAST, which stands for Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope, was completed in September 2016. (Xinhua/Jin Liwang)

 

Li Di, chief scientist at the National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC), introduces the findings of two pulsars by the China-based FAST, the world's largest single-dish radio telescope, in Beijing, capital of China, Oct. 10, 2017. After one year of trial operation, the FAST has identified two pulsars, the NAOC said Tuesday. Located in a naturally deep and round karst depression in southwest China's Guizhou Province, FAST, which stands for Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope, was completed in September 2016. (Xinhua/Jin Liwang)

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